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SPEECH ACOUSTICS
Acknowledgments
We thank Val Wood for providing the Dene Sųłiné exam- ple, Youran Lin for providing the Mandarin example, and Matthew Kelley for his comments on an early draft of this article.
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   About the Authors
 Benjamin V. Tucker
benjamin.tucker@ualberta.ca
Department of Linguistics
University of Alberta
4-32 Assiniboia Hall
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E7, Canada
Benjamin V. Tucker is a professor of phonetics in the Department of Linguistics, University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB, Canada). He is also the director of the Alberta Phonetics Laboratory. He received his PhD from the University of Arizona. His research focuses on cognitive aspects of the production and perception of spontaneous speech (e.g., “Wazat?” for “What is that?”). He also works on the documentation of endangered and
underdocumented languages.
Richard Wright rawright@uw.edu
Department of Linguistics
University of Washington
Box 352425
Seattle, Washington 98195-2428, USA
Richard Wright is a professor of pho-
netics in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Washington (Seattle). He is also the direc- tor of the Linguistic Phonetics Laboratory. He received his
PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA; Los Angeles) in 1996. His research addresses systematic vari- ation in the production and perception of spoken language. His other research interests include machine recognition of spoken language, hearing loss, and documentation of endan- gered and underdocumented languages.
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