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ADAPTED EARS OF TERRESTRIAL MAMMALS
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 About the Authors
Edward J. Walsh ewalsh@umn.edu
VA Loma Linda Healthcare System 12201 Benton Street
Loma Linda, California 92357,
USA
Edward J. Walsh is currently a senior
research scientist at the VA Loma Linda Healthcare System (Loma Linda, CA) and served as the director of research (otolaryngology) at the Southern
Illinois University School of Medicine (Springfield) and direc- tor of the Developmental Auditory Physiology Lab at Boys Town National Research Hospital (Omaha, NE) from 1990 until 2017. He holds an MA from the University of Illinois and a PhD from Creighton University (Omaha, NE). He, along with close collaborator JoAnn McGee, conducts studies in the areas of animal bioacoustics and auditory neurobiology. Current work in the area of animal bioacoustics is conducted with colleagues at the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis).
JoAnn McGee mcgeej@umn.edu
VA Loma Linda Healthcare System 12201 Benton Street
Loma Linda, California 92357,
USA
JoAnn McGee is a senior research sci-
entist at the VA Loma Linda Healthcare System (Loma Linda, CA). She received her PhD in physi- ology and pharmacology from Southern Illinois University
(Springfield) and spent over 25 years at the Boys Town National Research Hospital (Omaha, NE), conducting stud- ies focused primarily on mammalian auditory physiology in a biomedical context as well as comparative aspects along with her close collaborator Ed Walsh. Recent work has included studies of hearing and vocalization in eagles and other raptors conducted with colleagues at the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis).
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